Fiscal and Other Rules in EU Economic Governance: Helpful, Largely Irrelevant or Unenforceable?

by Begg, I
February, 2017

EU Member States, particularly in the Euro Area, have been pushed to adopt more extensive and intrusive fiscal rules, but what is the evidence that the rules are succeeding? The EU level Stability and Growth Pact (SGP) has been – and remains – the most visible rule-book, but it has been complemented by a profusion … Continued

Analysing the Relevance of the MIP Scoreboard’s Indicators

by Tomáš, D, Filip, O, Ivana, S, Mária, S
February, 2017

The EU established an early warning system by introducing the Macroeconomic Imbalance Procedure (MIP) in the wake of the recent recession. Nevertheless, it has been found by some authors to be rather vague when launching the Excessive Imbalances Procedure. Performed analysis reflects on such views and treats the MIP indicators as a system while assessing … Continued

A Public Investment Stimulus in Surplus Countries and Its Spillovers in the EA.

by Jan in't Veld
January, 2017

The Euro Area recommendations endorsed by the European Council in 2016 called for a differentiation of the fiscal effort by individual Member States, taking into account spillovers across Euro Area countries. This article shows model-based simulations of an increase in public investment in Germany and the Netherlands and their spillovers to the rest of the … Continued

UK scientists’ loss of influence to be felt at home and across Europe

by Thomas Koenig,
January, 2017

In the last days of 2016, the Swiss parliament adopted a compromise immigration law. As a result, the move consolidates various agreements of Switzerland with the European Union (EU). The law guarantees access to the European single market, on which Swiss industry and businesses heavily depend on. As a key consequence, Switzerland is now also … Continued

Public Investment in Belgium – Current State and Economic Impact

by Bernadette Biatour, Chantal Kegels, Jan van der Linden , Dirk Verwerft
January, 2017

Belgian government investment, and specifically the part spent on infrastructure, is relatively low both in historical terms and compared to neighbouring countries. A simulation with the European Commission’s Quest III model suggests that increasing government investment permanently by 0.5% of GDP leads to a growth in GDP, private consumption and private investment. The impact of … Continued

Improving the Employment Prospects of Graduates: What Can Universities Do?

by  Seamus McGuinness , Adele Whelan , Adele Bergin
January, 2017

This study focuses on the labour market transitions of European university graduates. The research examines the factors influencing the likelihood of newly qualified university graduates becoming mismatched on entering the labour market.

Serbia Functional Review: Efficiency Analysis of the National Employment Service

by Koettl, Johannes, Schnabl, Alexander, Hofer, Helmut, Lappöhn, Sarah, Pohl, Alina, Zenz, Hannes
January, 2017

Introduction; Technical Approach and Methodology; Results; Executive Summary; Details for individual branch offices; Literature

Effectively Maintained Inequality in Educational Transitions in the Republic of Ireland

by Delma Byrne , Selina McCoy
January, 2017

While it is well established that the structure and organization of the education system affects youth transitions, less attention has been paid to the study of qualitative distinctions at the same level of education over time in the Irish context. Using data from the School Leavers’ Survey over the period 1980-2006, this paper considers the … Continued

The effect of financial development on economic growth: a meta-analysis

by Michiel Bijlsma, Clemens Kool, Marielle Non
January, 2017

The financial crisis has renewed interest in the finance-growth relationship. We analyze the empirical literature and find a moderate positive but decreasing effect of finance on growth. Empirical studies on the finance-growth relationship show a wide range of estimated effects. We perform a meta-analysis on in total 551 estimates from 68 empirical studies that take … Continued

Early Skill Formation and the Efficiency of Parental Investment

by  Orla Doyle , Colm Harmon , James Heckman , Caitríona Logue , Seong Hyeok Moon
January, 2017

This Research Bulletin summaries key findings from a study on the early effects of the Preparing for Life home visiting programme.

Social Benefits, Minimum income and Basic income: Federal Province of Upper Austria curtails minimum income benefits for refugees.

by Marcel Fink
January, 2017

Starting from 1 July 2016, minimum income benefits got substantially reduced for beneficiaries of subsidiary protection and for persons granted temporary political asylum in the Federal Province of Upper Austria. This decision was taken irrespective of doubts about its constitutionality and conformity with international law, and irrespective of a general nationwide debate on a possible … Continued

Introduction of compulsory education and training up to the age of 18 in Austria

by Marcel Fink
January, 2017

In Austria, compulsory schooling ends at the age of 15. Yet, a reform which came into force in June 2016 introduces compulsory education and training up to the age of 18. The objective of the reform is to prevent young people from achieving only very low levels of education, which often results in poor job … Continued

A Study of Sub-Minimum Wage Rates for Young People

by  Elish Kelly , Seamus McGuinness
January, 2017

The ESRI and the Low Pay Commission jointly published “A Study of Sub-Minimum Wage Rates for Young People”, a new report that examines international practice on the extent to which sub-minimum wage rates are paid within National Minimum Wage (NMW) frameworks and how such wage rates are generally designed. The report also uses historical data … Continued

Life-cycle effects in small business finance

by Ilkka Ylhäinen
January, 2017

This paper studies the life-cycle profiles of small firms’ cost and use of credit using a panel of Finnish firms. The choice of method matters for the conclusions drawn about the relationship between firm age and financing costs; the cross-sectional age profiles of financing costs are hump-shaped and consistent with hold-up theories, whereas methods that … Continued

Intended Nationally Determined Contribution and low-carbon pathway to 2050″

by Fragkos, P., Tasios, N., Paroussos, L., Capros, P. Tsani, S.
January, 2017

In March 2015 the European Union (EU) submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) the Intended Nationally Determined Contribution (INDC) in view of the Paris Conference of Parties (COP21). The binding target of lowering domestic greenhouse gases emissions by at least 40% by 2030 compared to 1990 levels, coupled with long-term … Continued

Enhancing the potential contribution of minimum income schemes to a more social Europe.

by Hugh Frazer, Eric Marlier
January, 2017

The 2008 economic and financial crisis and subsequent financial consolidation (austerity) policies have drawn attention to serious weaknesses in Social Europe and to the inadequate development of social protection policies in many countries. In particular, they have highlighted very clearly the major importance of ensuring adequate social safety nets in all countries. In 2015, with … Continued

Accounting for the Business Cycle Reduces the Estimated Losses from Systemic Banking Crises

by Rob Luginbuhl, Adam Elbourne
December, 2016

We re-estimate the effects of systemic banking crises in industrialised countries reported by Cerra and Saxena with a model that includes transitory business cycle shocks. We use the correlation between countries’ business cycles to identify temporary business cycle shocks, which helps prevent these transitory shocks being incorrectly explained by the crisis dummy.

The Prospects for Future Economic Growth in the Euro Area

by  Kieran McQuinn , Karl Whelan
December, 2016

With a long-term projection of TFP growth of 0.2 per cent, a gradual decline in the work-age population and a static average workweek, we project a “baseline” average real GDP growth rate in the euro area of just 0.6 per cent over the next decade — even if the unemployment rate and investment share of … Continued

Situation of young NEETs needs better interpretation

by Rita Asplund, Pekka Vanhala
December, 2016

Over the past months there have been lively discussions about Finnish NEETs, i.e. those young people who are Not in Education, Employment, or Training. Recent OECD calculations show that of all the OECD countries, the NEET share of people aged 20–24 is among the highest in Finland, 18.3 %. In addition, the share is reported … Continued

Earnings-related unemployment security, employment and lifetime income

by Niku Määttänen, Tarmo Valkonen
December, 2016

Earnings-related unemployment benefits weaken markedly the economic incentives for searching and accepting a job. This study estimates that the current Finnish unemployment insurance scheme lowers the number of employed by tens of thousands of persons. The scheme may also weaken the incentives of the firms to create new vacancies and thereby hinder the employment of … Continued

Wind in Sails. Citizens’ strategy for the development of the Polish capital market.

by Maciej Bitner, Maciej Bukowski
December, 2016

The mission of WiseEuropa is to improve the quality of domestic and European policies and the economic environment by grounding them in sound economic and institutional analyses, independent research and assessments of the impact of policies on the economy. The Institute invites citizens, entrepreneurs, experts and authors of public policies, at home and abroad, to … Continued

Measuring functional integration by identifying the trip chains and the profiles of cross-border workers: empirical evidences from Luxembourgh.

by Guillaume Drevon, Philippe Gerber, Olivier Klein, Christophe Enaux
December, 2016

The number of cross-border workers in Luxembourg has steadily increased over the last 30 years. In the collective imagination these cross-border workers come to the Grand Duchy just to work. This paper challenges this representation by measuring the functional integration of cross-border workers in Luxembourg. Using some useful tools linked to the field of Time … Continued

The Economic Impact of Brexit-induced Reductions in Migration.

by Jonathan Portes, Giuseppe Forte
December, 2016

Two issues dominated the UK’s Brexit referendum debate: immigration and the economy. But the nature of discussion of these two topics was very different, and to a large extent compartmentalised. During the campaign, there was extensive discussion of the economic impact of Brexit on the UK economy. Detailed projections, under different scenarios for the post-Brexit … Continued

WiseEuropa: private investors’ intervention would be an opportunity to create new jobs in the mining industry .

by Alexander Śniegocki
December, 2016

3The rapid increase in the cost of coal mining in Poland, together with a permanent fall in the prices of that raw material on the market, brought about the lasting unprofitability of numerous Polish mines. ‘For the Polish mining industry, the lower prices of coal mean cost-cutting, closing indebted mines or restructuring mining companies by … Continued

The population at risk of poverty or social exclusion in Belgium – Projection until 2030

by Jean-Maurice Frère
November, 2016

This Working Paper presents, on the basis of information available until July 2016, a projection at unchanged policy until 2030 of the population at risk of poverty or social exclusion in Belgium, as defined in the framework of the Europe 2020 Strategy. This population should amount to 2.232 million people in 2018, or 418 000 … Continued

Organization and Supply of Long-term Care Services for the Elderly: A Bird’s-eye View of Old and New EU Member States

by Monika Riedel, Markus Kraus, Susanne Mayer
November 2016

This article provides an overview of the organization of formal long-term care (LTC) systems for the elderly in ten old and 11 new EU member states (MS). Generally, we find that the main responsibility for regulating LTC services is centralized in half of these countries, whereas in the remaining countries, this responsibility is typically shared … Continued

Brexit and Social Security in the EU

by Elspeth Guild
November 2016

According to the British Prime Minister, Theresa May, “Brexit means Brexit” and the UK will be leaving the EU. From the various statements issued by the Prime Minister and her new Home Secretary, “Brexit means Brexit” seems to mean that “Brexit means in any event the end of free movement of (non-British) EU citizens to … Continued

Exposure, participation in human resource management practices and employee attitudes.

by Laetitia Hauret, Ludivine Martin, Nessrine Omrani, Donald R. Williams
November 2016

Existing evidence on Human Resource Management (HRM) strategy has been limited to separate analyses of the relationship between exposure to or participation in HRM and employee attitudes which affect overall firm performance. This paper is the first to integrate the two perspectives in a single analysis. Using employer-employee matched data with both exposure and participation … Continued

Pension Insecurity and Wellbeing in Europe.

by Javier Olivera, Valentina Ponomarenko
November 2016

This paper studies pension insecurity in a sample of non-retired individuals aged 50 years or older from 18 European countries. We capture pension insecurity with the subjective expectations on the probability that the government will reduce the pensions of the individual before retirement or will increase the statutory retirement age. We argue that changes in … Continued

The Pension Conundrum.

by National Institute of Economic and Social Research
November 2016

Life expectancy has almost doubled since pensions were first introduced for government employees 100 years ago. To continue to afford pensions in the future we have limited options, each presenting difficult trade-offs. Meanwhile both private and public sector provision is changing.

The pension conundrum

by Alexander Danzer, Peter Dolton, Chiara Rosazza Bondibene
November, 2016

Life expectancy has almost doubled since pensions were first introduced for government employees 100 years ago. To continue to afford pensions in the future we have limited options, each presenting difficult trade-offs. Meanwhile both private and public sector provision is changing.

The Stabilisation Properties of a European Unemployment Benefit Scheme.

by Daniel Gros
November 2016

In this contribution, Daniel Gros focuses on the (macro-economic) stabilisation properties of a potential European unemployment benefits scheme (EUBS). He notes that any such scheme would involve many other aspects, both political and economic, but it could be argued that an EUBS, especially one that pays benefits directly to individuals, would constitute a powerful illustration … Continued

Business Cycle Synchronization in the EMU: Core vs. Periphery.

by Ansgar Belke, Clemens Domnick, Daniel Gros
November 2016

This paper examines business cycle synchronization in the European Monetary Union with a special focus on the core-periphery pattern in the aftermath of the crisis.  Using  a  quarterly index for business cycle synchronization by Cerqueira (2013), our panel data estimates suggest that it is countries belonging to the core that  are faced with  increased  synchronization … Continued

Trump’s election foreshadows further divisions in Europe.

by Daniel Gros, Steven Blockmans
November 2016

The victory of Donald Trump has sent shockwaves throughout Europe. Under President Trump, US domestic and foreign policies can be expected to become more volatile and less predictable. For years, Trump has fairly consistently espoused the view that the US has been taken advantage of by the free-riding of its so-called ‘strategic’ partners. With Trump, … Continued

Stuck in a trap? Long-term unemployment under two-tier unemployment compensation schemes

by Wolfgang Nagl, Michael Weber
November 2016

We empirically investigate how two-tier unemployment compensation schemes affect the profile of re-employment hazards. We exploit the aggravation of an existing two-tier scheme in Germany in 2005 and estimate its impact on re-employment rates at different durations. For the short-term unemployed, the hazard rate increases and negative duration dependence declines. For the long-term unemployed, we … Continued

UK and Europe – what next?

by  J.Chadha
November 2016

It is somewhat of a truism but the UK has had a difficult relationship with the European Union, and its predecessors the European Economic Community and the European Community, along many dimensions, as long-run polling data and both the announcement and result of this year’s advisory Referendum confirm. But, despite imminent exit from Union, the … Continued

Immigration after Brexit

by  Portes, J
November 2016

This paper examines the short and long-term impacts of the UK referendum on migration flows and migration policy. Even in the short term – before any policy change – the vote will affect migration flows directly and indirectly through both economic and other channels. Post Brexit, two key issues will need to be addressed. Will … Continued

Negotiating the UK’s post-Brexit trade arrangements.

by  Holmes, P, Rollo, J, Winters, L A.
November 2016

This paper considers the agenda for UK trade negotiations over the post-Brexit period. There are several groups of countries that will need to be dealt with and we consider the priorities among them. Negotiations with the WTO and the EU are the most important and the most pressing in time, and should be pursued simultaneously. … Continued

A Two-parameter Family of Socio-economic Health Inequality Indices: Accounting for Risk and Inequality Aversions.

by  Stéphane Mussard, Maria Noel Pi Alperin.
oktober 2016

This paper proposes a two-parameter family of socio-economic health inequality indices. First, these indices allow a Boolean risk factor to be associated to other health dimensions. Second, multidimensional health distributions can be compared thanks to a stochastic dominance rule, which includes the attitude of the social planner with respect to the risk factor (risk neutrality, … Continued

The Impact of Uncertainty Shocks: Continental Europe versus the Anglo-Saxon World

by Joris de Wind, Katarzyna Grabska
September, 2016

For economic forecasting it is important to know how the real economy responds to major events such as the fall of the Soviet Union, the Greek debt crisis, the recent terrorism attacks in Europe, and the Brexit. In addition to potential direct effects, such major events lead to an increase in uncertainty about the economy … Continued

“Muddling Through” Once Again – The Long Term Development of the Dualistic Austrian VET System

by Lorenz Lassnigg
September, 2016

Austria with its specific ‘dual’ structure, including both, a strong fulltime school sector and a strong apprenticeship system, lies in-between the established classifications of VET. This structure is not a result of ‘systemic’ political decision-making; rather the different institutions have evolved more or less parallel. It is a remarkable phenomenon that the formal structure has … Continued

Do intergration policies relate to economic and cultural threat perceptions? A comparative study in Europe.

by CALLENS Marie-Sophie, MEULEMAN Bart
August, 2016

In this article, we analyse the relationship between integration policies and perceived intergroup threat across European countries. By distinguishing between several strands of integration policies and forms of threat (economic vs cultural), we attempt to shed more light on the mechanisms underlying the policy-threat nexus. We combine data from The European Values Study of 2008 … Continued

Dividend taxation of non-listed companies, resource allocation and productivity

by Niku Määttänen, Olli Ropponen
August, 2016

We consider the taxation of non-listed companies and their owners in Finland. We analyse how the current highly non-linear dividend taxation influences the allocation of labour and capital across different firms, average labour productivity and the equilibrium wage level. To this end, we use a general equilibrium model of firm investment where firms may have … Continued

How do severance pay and job search assistance jointly affect unemployment duration and job quality?

by Wiljan van den Berge
August 2016

Many countries require firms to pay severance pay to workers displaced in a mass layoff .Displaced workers often also receive some form of job search assistance. While these may be useful policies on their own, severance pay could undermine job search assistance eff orts. Yet, we know very little about the net e ffects of these policies. This … Continued

One pillar crumbling, the others too short: Old-age provision in Germany

by M. Werding
August, 2016

Responding to the challenges of demographic ageing, the German system of old-age provision has undergone substantial changes during the last two decades and is in fact still under reconstruction. Benefit levels deriving from the public pay-as-you-go scheme will decline until 2060, while contribution rates may still go up substantially. Additional cover from private or occupational … Continued

Track Employers’ responses to Brexit: The perspective of employers in low skilled sectors

by  Rolfe, H
August, 2016

The EU referendum gave an equal say to all eligible voters but some had more of a stake in the outcome than others, among them employers of EU migrants. Between the end of 2015 and early 2016 we interviewed 24 employers in the low skilled sectors of food and drink, hospitality and construction about free … Continued

A multidimensional approach to measure health.

by Maria Noel Pi Alperin
August, 2016

In this paper, we borrowed the methodology of the so-called “fuzzy approach to multidimensional poverty measurement” (see Cerioli and Zani, 1990) in order to propose a different approach to measuring health. This multidimensional indicator satisfies three decomposition properties: by group, by health items, and the so-called multidimensional decomposition. These techniques allows to better evaluate the … Continued

The Effect of Social Benefits on Youth Employment: Combining RD and a Behavioral Model.

by BARGAIN Olivier, DOORLEY Karina
August, 2016

Natural experiments provide robust identifying assumptions for the estimation of policy effects. Yet their use for policy design is often limited by the difficulty of extrapolating on the basis of reduced-form estimates. In this study, we exploit an age condition in the eligibility for social assistance in France, which lends itself to a regression discontinuity … Continued

Model Calculations of Short-Term Forecasts of Social and Economic Indices of the Russian Federation

by M.Turuntseva, E.Astafieva, M.Bayeva, A.Bozhechkova, A.Buzaev, T.Kiblitskaya, Yu.Ponomarev, A.Skrobotov
August, 2016

This paper presents calculations of various economic indicators for the Russian Federation in the period from July to December 2016, which were performed using time series models developed as a result of research conducted by the Gaidar Institute over the past few years.

The Effect Of The Reforms To Compulsion On Annuity Demand

by Edmund Cannon, Ian Tonks, Rob Yuille
August, 2016

This paper investigates the effect of recent regulatory changes to the compulsory annuitisation of tax-privileged pension savings, on the demand for annuities and other retirement products. We find that the demand for annuities has fallen by almost 75 per cent from its peak in 2012, and the demand for income drawdown products has increased. There is some evidence … Continued

Who Wins? Evaluating The Impact Of Uk Public Sector Pension Scheme Reforms.

by  Alex Danzer, Rosazza Bondibene, Peter Dolton
August, 2016

Radical changes have been implemented to pension schemes across the UK public sector from April 2015. This paper simulates how these changes will affect the lifetime pension and how the negotiated pension changes compare across six public sector schemes by level of education. Specifically, we simulate the occupation specific Defined Benefit (DB) pension wealth accumulated for a representative … Continued

The effect of social benefits on youth employment: combining RD and a behavioral model.

by  BARGAIN Olivier, DOORLEY Karina
June, 2016

Natural experiments provide robust identifying assumptions for the estimation of policy effects. Yet their use for policy design is often limited by the difficulty of extrapolating on the basis of reduced-form estimates. In this study, we exploit an age condition in the eligibility for social assistance in France, which lends itself to a regression discontinuity … Continued

Do national borders slow down knowledge diffusion within new technological fields? The case of big data in Europe

by Tatiana Kiseleva, Ali Palali, Bas Straathof
July, 2016

Big data technologies enhance the storage, processing, and analysis of large data sets and can be applied economy-wide. Despite this potential, only one percent of big data patents come from Europe. This paper investigates the di ffusion of big data technologies across national borders by using speed of big data patent citations. Using mixed proportional hazard … Continued

Measuring social protection for older people with long-term care needs in Belgium. A report on the completion of an OECD data collection questionnaire

by Karel Van den Bosch (A)
June, 2016

La protection sociale des soins de longue durée varie amplement selon les pays et, à ce jour, aucune comparaison systématique des expériences de patients recourant à ces soins dans différents pays n’a été réalisée. Face à ce déficit d’informations, l’OCDE et la Commission européenne (CE) ont lancé un projet visant à comparer quantitativement, par la … Continued

Toward appropriate criteria in medication adherence assessment in older persons: Position Paper

by Anna Giardini , Maria Teresa Martin , Caitriona Cahir , Elaine Lehane , Enrica Menditto , Maria Strano , Sergio Pecorelli , Alessandro Monaco
June, 2016

Nonadherence to medication regimens is a worldwide challenge; adherence rates range from 38 to 57 % in older populations with an average rate of less than 45 % and nonadherence contributes to adverse drug events, increased emergency visits and hospitalisations. Accurate measurement of medication adherence is important in terms of both research and clinical practice. However, the … Continued

Young Firms and Industry Dynamics in Belgium

by Michel Dumont, Chantal Kegels
June, 2016

Des études récentes ont mis en évidence l’importance des entrants et des jeunes entreprises pour la création d’emploi, la productivité et la croissance économique. Certains académiques soutiennent que la diminution du taux auquel les nouvelles entreprises sont créées peut entrer en ligne de compte pour expliquer le ralentissement de la productivité dont sont témoins la … Continued

A gust and calm. How the stock market drives the Polish economy?

by  Maciej Bitner, Maciej Bukowski, Urszula Siedlecka
June, 2016

The Warsaw Stock Exchange is one of the most important achievements of Polish transformation. Why then does the slogan “innovative economy” stir the imaginations of policy makers and the media, while the words “capital market” fail to elicit the same reaction? The answer to this question, among others, will be sought by the experts from … Continued

Cross Country Residential Investment Rates and the Implications for the Irish Housing Market

by David Duffy , Daniel Foley , Kieran McQuinn
June, 2016

Even by international standards, the experience of the Irish residential property market over the period 1995 to the present stands out. As the Irish economy rapidly converged to the living standards of other European countries from the mid-1990s onwards, activity in the property market increased dramatically. At that time the stock of Irish dwellings completed … Continued

Challenges in Achieving Universal Healthcare in Ireland

by Maev-Ann Wren , Sheelah Connolly
June, 2016

This paper reviews recent policy debate on the reform of Irish healthcare; and examines how universality is defined in healthcare, the rationale for its adoption and approaches to financing universal healthcare. Building on discussion of the White Paper model of UHI and its potential cost implications, the paper examines issues that need to be addressed … Continued

Low Pay, Minimum Wages and Household Incomes: Evidence for Ireland

by Caitríona Logue , Tim Callan
June, 2016

This paper examines the relationship between low hourly wages and household incomes, and the potential impact of increases in the national minimum wage on household poverty. Results based on up-to-date Irish data confirm the proportion of employees falling below the commonest low pay threshold (two-thirds of median hourly earnings) has increased from approximately 20 per … Continued

Corporate Taxation and Foreign Direct Investment in EU Countries: Policy Implications for Ireland

by Ronald B. Davies , Iulia Siedschlag , Zuzanna Studnicka
June, 2016

This research provides new empirical evidence on the impact of corporate taxation and other factors on the attractiveness of Ireland and other EU countries to foreign direct investment (FDI) over the period 2002-2013. In comparison to previous analyses which have considered individual countries as alternative locations,1 we analyse groups of EU countries with similar characteristics … Continued

What does UK referendum mean for the Central Europe

by  Mark Leonard, Vladimír Bartovic,Vladimír Bilčík, Paweł Zerka
June, 2016

Regardless of its outcome, the UK referendum will affect EU politics in Central Europe. GLOBSEC Policy Institute has asked top Czech, Slovak and Polish foreign policy analysts for their views. Please see the comment of Paweł Zerka, Head of Foreign Policy Research in WiseEuropa, which is the part of the article “A View from Central Europe: … Continued

Trade and Innovation: Matched Worker-Firm-Level Evidence

by Joonas Tuhkuri
June, 2016

This paper examines the relationship between globalization and innovation. To do so, it draws from data that match the full population of workers and private-sector firms in Finland tracking them from 1995 to 2009. To correct for endogeneity the paper considers variation in trade exposure from China during its entry to the world market using … Continued

ETLAnow: A Model for Forecasting with Big Data – Forecasting Unemployment with Google Searches in Europe

by Joonas Tuhkuri,
May, 2016

In this report we document the ETLAnow project. ETLAnow is a model for forecasting with big data. At the moment, it predicts the unemployment rate in the EU-28 countries using Google search data. This document is subject to updates as the ETLAnow project advances.

The role of wage adjustment in alleviating the economic crisis in Finland

by Markku Lehmus, Vesa Vihriälä
May, 2016

The paper analyses the impacts of two types of counter-factual real wage cuts on the key demand components, output and employment in Finland over the past few years. A freeze of contract wages at the 2010 level would have improved significantly employment in Finland by 2016. A cautious assessment is that the loss of jobs … Continued

Does independent needs assessment limit supply-side moral hazard in long-term care?

by Rudy Douven
March, 2016

The decision about the amount and type of care that a patient needs may be entrusted to health care providers or be delegated to an independent assessor. An independent assessment limits the scope for supply-side moral hazard and occurs frequently in long-term care (LTC), e.g. in the Netherlands, Germany, Belgium, Switzerland, and Japan. The characteristics … Continued

Assessment of the macroeconomic and sectoral effects of higher electricity and gas prices in the EU: A general equilibrium modeling approach.

by P. Capros, L. Paroussos, I. Charalampidis, K. Fragkiadakis, P. Karkatsoulis, S. Tsani,
March, 16

The macroeconomic and sectoral effects of differentials in energy prices between the EU and the non-EU countries in the horizon to 2050 are assessed with the use of GEM-E3, a Computable General Equilibrium model. Alternative scenario variants are quantified: In the first case EU policies and market structures regarding taxation, penetration of RES in power … Continued

“Assessment of the macroeconomic and sectoral effects of higher electricity and gas prices in the EU: A general equilibrium modeling approach”

by Pantelis Capros, Leonidas Paroussos, Ioannis Charalampidis, Kostas Fragkiadakis, Panagiotis Karkatsoulis, Stella Tsani
March, 2016

The macroeconomic and sectoral effects of differentials in energy prices between the EU and the non-EU countries in the horizon to 2050 are assessed with the use of GEM-E3, a Computable General Equilibrium model. Alternative scenario variants are quantified: In the first case EU policies and market structures regarding taxation, penetration of RES in power … Continued

The fight against unemployment: The case of Hungary

by Zoltan Adam
February, 2016

The paper discusses labor market developments and related policies in Hungary since the early 1990s, and was prepared in context of the project “Hidden Triggers of Economic Growth in V4 plus Ukraine” supported by the International Visegrad Fund (see also http://www.ineko.sk/projekty/visegrad-fund).

Improving the Stability and Growth Pact by integrating a proper accounting of public investments: a new attempt

by Henri Bogaert
January, 2016

L’amélioration du fonctionnement du Pacte de stabilité et de croissance (PSC) figure à nouveau à l’ordre du jour, d’autant que la baisse des investissements publics sous l’effet de processus d’ajustement budgétaire mis en oeuvre conformément aux règles du Pacte actuel est considérée comme un frein à la future croissance économique. Lorsque les discussions sur une … Continued

What caused the eurozone crisis?

by Richard Baldwin, Daniel Gros
December 3, 2015

After five years of crisis there are now signs that the eurozone economy is recovering, but it is far from being back to normal. The authors of this CEPS Commentary sound a note of caution: although progress has been made with the banking union and new institutions like the European Stability Mechanism (ESM), more needs … Continued

Environmental Policies, Innovation and Productivity in EU

by Roberta De Santis, Jona Lasinio C.
September, 2015

In a globalized framework, environmental regulations can have a decisive role in influencing countries’ comparative advantages. The conventional perception about environmental protection is that it imposes additional costs on firms, which may reduce their global competitiveness with negative effects on growth and employment. However, some economists, in particular Porter and Van der Linde (1995), argue … Continued

Structural Reforms and Stabilization Policies in the Euro Area

by Alho, Kari E.O.
August, 2015

Specifying a structurally built NKM model for EMU, and identifying in it the determinants of the potential output and the short-run cyclical factors, we consider structural reforms and monetary and fiscal policies in the euro area. Especially, we analyse whether structural reforms are deflationary or boost the economy in the short run and create spillovers … Continued

Evaluation practices in the selection of ground-breaking research proposals

by Terttu Luukkonen, Michael Stampfer and Michael Strassnig
August, 2015

The review empirically examines the proposal selection practices of seven funding organisations in schemes that explicitly aim to support ground-breaking research and focuses on the organisational practices of these funding organisations in their attempts to overcome the limitations and criticisms of conservatism in peer review, as copiously argued in debates on peer review. The review … Continued

Economic Trends in Eastern Europe 2015, Issue 2

by Katalin Nagy, Péter Vakhal, Zoltán Ádám, Mátyás Klauber, Zoltán Matheika, Éva Palócz, Annamária Pethő
August, 2015

Economic Trends in Eastern Europe is written by the research team of the Kopint-Tárki Economic Research Institute – the same group that has authored the previous 22 volumes of this publication. Each issue provides an analysis of the current economic situation as well as of the specific problems of economic growth and institutional changes in … Continued

Determinants for the transition from work into retirement in Europe

by Monika Riedel, Helmut Hofer, Birgit Wögerbauer
June, 2015

We use the labor force ad hoc module “transition from work into retirement” to analyze the link between individual as well as pension system characteristics and planned retirement age within the European Union. We find that timing of retirement is correlated between partners who are, already at the stage of retirement planning. In richer countries … Continued

Integrated support for the long-term unemployed: A study of national policies

by Denis Bouget, Hugh Frazer and Eric Marlier, with Ramón Peña-Casas, Bart Vanhercke
June, 2015

Economic Trends in Eastern Europe 2015 Issue 1

by Katalin Nagy, Péter Vakhal, Zoltán Matheika, Gábor Oblath, Éva Palócz, Annamária Pethő
May, 2015

Economic Trends in Eastern Europe is written by the research team of the Kopint-Tárki Economic Research Institute – the same group that has authored the previous 22 volumes of this publication. Each issue provides an analysis of the current economic situation as well as of the specific problems of economic growth and institutional changes in … Continued

Alternatives for Measuring Structural Budgetary Position

by Tero Kuusi
May, 2015

One of the greatest challenges faced by counter-cyclical economic policy lies in recognising the nature of shocks affecting the economy. Economic policy should react to permanent structural shocks in a different manner than to temporary shocks of a cyclical nature. It is often sensible to counteract cyclical challenges by temporarily adjusting public expenditure and debt. … Continued

Social Investment in Europe: A study of national policies

by Denis Bouget, Hugh Frazer, Eric Marlier, Sebastiano Sabato, Bart Vanhercke
April, 2015

Current Account ‘Core-Periphery Dualism’ in the EMU

by Roberta De Santis, Tatiana Cesaroni
March, 2015

Current account dispersion within EU member states has been increasing since the 1990s. Interestingly, the persistent deficits in many peripheral countries have not been accompanied by a significant growth process that is able to stimulate a long-run rebalancing, as neoclassical theory predicts. To shed light on the issue this paper investigates the determinants of eurozone current … Continued

The determinants of errors and omissions in a small and open economy: The case of Slovakia

by Mária Širaňová, Menbere Workie Tiruneh
January, 2015

This paper aims to empirically explore dynamics of the Net errors and omissions in a small and open economy of Slovakia. Data on the Net errors and omissions during the 2008-2014 period, which is known as the Great Recession, seem to suggest that the change in trend has been predominantly a phenomenon of real economy, … Continued

Enhancing the Legitimacy of EMU Governance

by Cinzia Alcidi, Alessandro Giovannini, Sonia Piedrafita
Dec, 2014

This CEPS Special Report investigates ways to enhance the legitimacy of economic governance in the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) without introducing Treaty changes. It suggests changes in the governance framework at both the institutional and economic level. Input-oriented legitimacy can be improved by increasing parliamentary oversight on decisions related to EMU and increasing the … Continued

Labour Market Reforms and Current Account Imbalances: Beggar-thy-neighbour policies in a currency union?

by Timo Baas, Ansgar Belke
September, 2014

Member countries of the Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) initiated wide-ranging labour market reforms in the last decade. This process is ongoing as countries that are faced with serious labour market imbalances perceive reforms as the fastest way to restore competitiveness within a currency union. This fosters fears among observers about a beggar-thy-neighbour policy that … Continued

Anti-Europe Political Parties: Will they Conquer the EU?

by Manuela Caiani
May, 2014

The Radical right appears to be on the rise all over Europe, and the approaching European elections are likely to provide – the current IHS Standpunkt argues – a useful opportunity for radical parties and organizations to have their voices heard and their institutional power increased. They are likely to increase their agenda setting capacity … Continued

Long-run Relations between Childhood Shocks and Health in Late Adulthood–Evidence from the Survey of Health, Ageing, and Retirement in Europe

by Nicole Halmdienst, Rudolf Winter-Ebmer
April, 2014

In this article, we address the long-run associations between childhood shocks and health in late adulthood. Applying a life-course approach and data from SHARE, we estimate direct and indirect relations of shocks like relocation, dispossession, or hunger and health outcomes after 50 years of age. Having lived in a children’s home, in a foster family, … Continued

Quality of life in Europe: Quality of society and public services. 3rd European Quality of Life Survey

by Michaela Gstrein, Liliana Mateeva, Petra Rodiga-Laßnig, Pamela Abbott, Pamelam, Claire Wallace
Jan, 2014

This report explores how Europeans perceive the quality of their societies, and of their public services. It looks at such aspects of society as trust in institutions and other people, perceived tensions between social groups, attitudes towards migrants and the effects of the economic crisis on social inclusion and social cohesion. It finds that satisfaction … Continued

The Slovak Experience with Transition to Market Economy

by Ivana Šikulová, Karol Frank
January, 2013

  While in the Western Europe market economy had developed several centuries, in the Central and Eastern European countries (CEECs) the transition has been undertaken in a considerably shorter time. Although, the long-term objectives of CEECs were similar, discrepancies arose in each country as regards the priorities, order and pace of the reforms to be … Continued

Statistical Appendices to “Performance of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe”

by Esther Mot, Riemer Faber, Joanna Geerts, Peter Willemé
December, 2012

This document provides statistical appendices underpinning the research presented in ENEPRI Research Report No. 117, “Performance of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe”, December 2012. Esther Mot is Senior Researcher in the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB) and Riemer Faber is researcher at CPB. Joanna Geerts is researcher and Peter Willemé is health economist … Continued

Performance of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe

by Esther Mot, Riemer Faber, Joanna Geerts, Peter Willemé
December, 2012

The evaluation of long-term care (LTC) systems carried out in Work Package 7 of the ANCIEN project shows which performance criteria are important and – based on the available information – how European countries score on those criteria. This paper summarises the results and discusses the policy implications. An overall evaluation was carried out for … Continued

Technological Solutions Potentially Influencing the Future of Long-Term Care

by Angelo Rossi Mori, Roberto Dandi, Marta Mazzeo, Rita Verbicaro, Gregorio Mercurio , Esther Mot
July, 2012

This report provides a forecast of the potential direct and indirect influences of various kinds of technologies on the LTC milieu, answering the following question: from a technology-driven perspective: “Consider each technological solution. What could be its future usage in the LTC sector?” Future technological deployments will induce changes in the respective roles of the … Continued

Role and Potential Influence of Technologies on the Most Relevant Challenges for Long-Term Care

by Marta Mazzeo, Patrizia Agnello , Angelo Rossi Mori
April, 2012

This report considers three case studies (namely diabetes, dementia and obesity) for setting up a framework to assess the systemic influences of technologies in the long-term care milieu, using a problem-driven approach in relation to health care. Such technologies could be an enabling factor or a catalyser of advances taking place in the health and … Continued

Long-Term Care Use and Supply in Europe: Projection Models and Results for Germany, the Netherlands, Spain and Poland

by Joanna Geerts, Peter Willemé, Esther Mot
April, 2012

EDITORS: Joanna Geerts is researcher and Peter Willemé is health economist in the Social Security Research Group at the Federal Planning Bureau (FPB), Esther Mot is senior researcher in the Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis (CPB). Chapters are written by Joanna Geerts, Peter Willemé, Linda Pickard, Derek King, Adelina Comas-Herrera, Jérôme Wittwer, Andreas Golz, Ester … Continued

Determinants of Institutional Long-Term Care in Germany

by Erika Schultz
April, 2012

In Germany the majority of people in need of care are living at home with the help of their family and/or professional carers. Admission into a nursing is seen as the last step. Caregiving in nursing homes is required if caregiving at home is not possible due to the absence of an informal carer or … Continued

Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union, Country Report: Poland

by Stanisława Golinowska, Izabela Styczyńska
April, 2012

The aim of this report is to bring together all the information concerning quality assurance in long-term care (LTC) in Poland. In doing so, we analyse a number of legal regulations and administrative actions in the health care and social sectors, review reports on quality control by the supervising institutions and look at the available … Continued

Quality Assurance Indicators of Long-Term Care in European Countries

by Roberto Dandi, Georgia Casanova
April, 2012

This study reports on the quality indicators that were collected by the ANCIEN project partners in each country considered in Work Package 5 (Quality in Long-Term Care). The main contribution of this report is a classification of the quality assurance indicators in different European countries according to three dimensions: organisation type (indicators applied to formal … Continued

Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union, Country Report: France

by Beatrice Fermon, Marie-Eve Joël
April, 2012

Quality assurance policies for long-term care in France are founded on a law passed in 2002, but the organisation of the system is still underway. It is principally based on a legal framework that sets out requirements for quality monitoring and quality improvement. Quality assessment is related to outcomes, indicators and guidelines. It pertains to … Continued

Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union, Country Report: Latvia

by Baiba Plakane
March, 2012

This paper describes the quality assurance system for long-term care services in Latvia. Policy planning for long-term care is undertaken by the Ministry of Welfare and the municipalities. Monitoring takes place at three levels: by the ministry, the municipalities and social service providers themselves. The legislation sets out requirements for social service providers and the … Continued

Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in Estonia

by Agris Koppel, Gerli Paat-Ahi
March, 2012

An assessment of quality assurance policies in LTC in Estonia finds in general that much progress has been achieved in creating and monitoring the quality of inputs of services (infrastructure, personnel, planning and funding). Some attempts have been made to evaluate the processes of LTC services, but almost nothing is found about the evaluation of … Continued

Long-Term Care Quality Assurance Policies in the European Union

by Roberto Dandi, Georgia Casanova, Roberto Lillini , Massimo Volpe , Antonio Giulio De Belvis , Maria Avolio , Ferruccio Pelone
March, 2012

This report analyses the quality assurance policies for long-term care (LTC) in the following countries: Austria, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Latvia, Poland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom.

Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union, Country Report: Austria

by Thomas Czypionka, Markus Kraus, Marcel Kalmar
February, 2012

In Austria, the responsibilities for long-term care mainly lie with the provinces, although federal and organisational-level initiative has grown. Quality assurance policies focus overwhelmingly on the health system and are only slowly appearing in the realm of long-term care (LTC). Although the Austrian LTC system is still very fragmented owing to the division of competencies, … Continued

Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union, Country Report: Slovenia

by Valentina Prevolnik Rupel, Marko Ogorevc, Boris Majcen
February, 2012

In Slovenia, the government’s Strategy of Care for the Elderly up to 2010 attempted to introduce a new model to support families with elderly members, new programmes for elderly care with individual solutions and supportive social networks to foster the cohabitation of generations. Yet there is no national, quality management strategy. The most apparent difficulty … Continued

Demographic Epidemiologic Projections of Long-Term Care Needs in Selected European Countries: Germany, Spain, the Netherlands and Poland

by Luc Bonneux, Nicole Van der Gaag, Govert Bijwaart
February, 2012

The objectives of Work Package (WP) 2 of the EU FP7 project ANCIEN are to assess the actual and future numbers of elderly care-dependent persons in selected countries. Such projections are needed to support planning to meet future needs for long-term care (LTC) across the EU. This study has selected four countries for projections of … Continued

Executive Summary of Work Package 3 on Availability and Choice of Care of the ANCIEN Project

by Sergi Jiménez Martín, Raquel Vegas Sánchez, Cristina Vilaplana
February, 2012

Work Package 3 on the Availability and Choice of Care of the ANCIEN project aims to document the forces driving the choice of formal and informal care across European countries and to characterise the linkages between the type of care used by dependent people and a country’s institutional setting, which determines the supply of formal … Continued

Quality Assurance Policies and Indicators for Long-Term Care in the European Union, Country Report: Italy

by Georgia Casanova
February, 2012

In Italy, regions are at the centre of the system providing long-term care services, which typically include residential services, formal home care and monetary benefits. The regions define their own policies for the provision of care, ranging from needs assessment and monitoring tools to the accreditation of service providers. Quality assurance policies are primarily directed … Continued

Worlds Apart? Labour Unions, Wages and Monetary Integration in Continental Europe

by Bob Hancké
February, 2012

This paper examines the problems of the single currency in light of the organization of labour relations in the member-states and their interaction with monetary policies. Continental (western) Europe consists of two very different systemsof employment and labour relations, roughly coinciding with “coordinated market economies” (CME) in the north-west of the continent, and “Mixed Market … Continued

Determinants of the Probability of Obtaining Formal and Informal Long-Term Care in European Countries

by Izabela Marcinkowska, Agnieszka Sowa
November, 2011

The aim of this report is to identify patterns in the utilisation of formal and informal long-term care (LTC) across European countries and discuss possible determinants of demand for different types of care. It addresses specific research questions on the volume of different types of care and the conditions under which care is provided. The … Continued

The Relationship between Formal and Informal Care in Europe and Its Implications for the Number of Caregiving Hours

by Sergi Jiménez-Martín, Raquel Vegas Sánchez, Cristina Vilaplana Prieto
November, 2011

Understanding the factors that determine the type and amount of formal care is important for assessing the need for care in European nations and developing consistent long-term policies. In this report, the provision of care in terms of its extensive (choice of care) and intensive qualities (the number of hours of care received) is analysed. … Continued

Informal Care, Labour Force Participation and Unmet Needs for Formal Care in the EU-27, Croatia and Turkey

by Cristina Vilaplana Pietro
November, 2011

This study seeks to estimate the effects of problems in labour force participation and unmet needs for formal care on informal caregiving. Using information for 2007 from Eurobarometer 283/Wave 67.3 for the EU-27 and the two candidate countries, Turkey and Croatia, we estimate a trivariate probit model dealing with the potential endogeneity of labour force … Continued

Impact of Long-Term Care on Caregivers’ Participation in the Labour Market

by Stefania Gabriele, Paola Tanda, Fabrizio Tediosi
November, 2011

This paper analyses the impact of long-term care on informal caregivers’ status in the labour market. It focuses on people’s perceptions that their labour activity is hindered partially or totally by their care-giving commitments. It uses the Eurostat ECHP dataset 1994-2001, which includes some questions specifically aimed to investigate whether people suffer care-giving constraints; this … Continued

The Organisation of Formal Long-Term Care for the Elderly: Results from the 21 European Country Studies in the ANCIEN Project

by Monika Riedel, Markus Kraus
November, 2011

This report investigates the organisation and provision of long-term care for the elderly population in 21 member states of the European Union, thus including both old as well as new member states. It highlights several aspects regulating long-term care systems, e.g. which level of government is responsible for regulation or for capacity-planning and how access … Continued

Informal Care Provision in Europe: Regulation and Profile of Providers

by Monika Riedel, Markus Kraus
November, 2011

This report investigates regulations for the provision of informal care in 21 member states of the European Union. We focus on the comparison of public support for informal care, and compare in detail the monetary benefits that can be used to finance informal care. Additionally, we use SHARE data to compare characteristics of informal carers … Continued

The Supply of Informal Care in Europe

by Linda Pickard
September, 2011

This research report is concerned with the analysis of the supply of informal care provided by family and friends in Europe, and forms part of the Assessing Needs of Care in European Nations (ANCIEN) research project. The research uses multivariate analysis of the provision of informal help with personal care tasks in Europe, taking into … Continued

The Long-Term Care Workforce: Description and Perspectives

by Joanna Geerts
August, 2011

This ANCIEN project research report provides a comparative analysis of the size and composition of the long-term care (LTC) workforce in four European countries – Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, and Poland – each representative of a different type of LTC system. Trends over the 1993-2008 period show substantial differences in care worker density, with the … Continued

Institutionalisation and Quality of Life for Elderly People in Finland

by Petri Böckerman, Edvard Johansson, Samuli Saarni
August, 2011

In Finland, a clear policy objective in the long-term care debate is to increase possibilities for elderly people to live in their own homes for as long as possible. At the same time, the number of places in public sector old-age institutions is being cut, partly because institutional care is very costly.

A Typology of Long-Term Care Systems in Europe

by Markus Kraus, Monika Riedel, Esther Mot, Peter Willemé, Gerald Röhrling, Thomas Czypionka
August, 2010

This report aims at contributing to knowledge on long-tem care (LTC) system design features by developing a typology of LTC system models in EU countries, which are characterized by diverse arrangements for the provision of care/organization and financing. Its approach deviates from existing typologies in a number of ways.

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Finland

by Edvard Johansson
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Germany

by Erika Schulz
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Hungary

by Karoly Czibere, Robert I. Gal
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Italy

by Fabrizio Tediosi, Stefania Gabriele
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Latvia

by Kaspar Ilves, Baiba Plakane
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Lithuania

by Izabela Marcinkowska
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Poland

by Stanisława Golinowska
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Portugal

by Marie-Eve Joël, Sandrine Dufour-Kippelen, Sanda Samitca
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

Long-Term Care in Romania

by Daniela Popa
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Slovakia

by Marek Radvanský, Viliam Páleník
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Spain

by Maria Fernanda Gutiérrez, Sergi Jiménez-Martín, Raquel Vegas Sánchez, Cristina Vilaplana
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Sweden

by Nanna Fukushima, Johanna Adami, Mårten Palme
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in the Netherlands

by Esther Mot, with the cooperation of Ali Aouragh, Marieke De Groot, Hein Mannaerts
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in France

by Marie-Eve Joël, Sandrine Dufour-Kippelen, Catherine Duchêne, Mathilde Marmier
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

Long-Term Care in Estonia

by Gerli Paat, Merle Merilain
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Slovenia

by Valentina Prevolnik Rupel, Marko Ogorevc, Boris Majcen
June, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Austria

by Monika Riedel, Markus Kraus
May, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Belgium

by Peter Willemé
May, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The System of Long-Term Care in Bulgaria

by Ludmila Mincheva, Galina Kanazireva
May, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The System of Long-Term Care in the Czech Republic

by Agnieszka Sowa
May, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in Denmark

by Erika Schulz
May, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

The Long-Term Care System for the Elderly in England

by Adelina Comas-Herrera, Linda Pickard, Raphael Wittenberg, Juliette Malley, Derek King
May, 2010

Launched in January 2009, ANCIEN is a research project that runs for a 44-month period and involves 20 partners from EU member states. The project principally concerns the future of long-term care (LTC) for the elderly in Europe and addresses two questions in particular: 1) How will need, demand, supply and use of LTC develop? … Continued

Adequacy of Pension Systems in Europe: An analysis based on comprehensive replacement rates

by Margherita Borella, Elsa Fornero
April, 2009

The aim of this paper is to develop indicators to highlight the ability of different national pension systems to enable individuals to maintain their living standards at retirement. Authors Margherita Borella and Elsa Fornero of the University of Turin and CeRP, perform the analysis using data and projections on different European countries and propose the … Continued

Towards sustainable but still adequate pensions in the EU: Theory, trends and simulations

by Juraj Draxler, Jørgen Mortensen
April, 2009

This report is a summary of the research project on the “Adequacy and Sustainability of Old-Age Income Maintenance” (AIM). Thirteen institutes from across the EU have collaborated on the task of assessing the situation of today’s pensioners and providing insights into future trends and policy options for securing adequate income for EU pensioners.

Measuring the Sustainability of Pension Systems through a Microsimulation Model: The Case of Italy

by Flavia Coda Moscarola
January, 2009

Many countries have recently enacted radical reforms to their pension systems to recover long-term financial sustainability. One measure has been to introduce an actuarially fair pension rule. A system that grants actuarially fair benefits is not only fair across individuals and generations, i.e. it grants equality of treatment, but is also sustainable in the long … Continued

What are the consequences of the AWG-projections for the adequacy of social security pensions?

by Gijs Dekkers, Hermann Buslei, Maria Cozzolino, Raphael Desmet, Johannes Geyer, Dirk Hofmann, Michele Raitano, Viktor Steiner, Paola Tanda, Simone Tedeschi, Frédéric Verschueren
January, 2009

This paper starts by describing the model MIDAS in detail. It next presents and discusses some simulation results for Belgium, Germany and Italy. Finally, the simulation results of two alternative policy scenarios are presented and discussed.

Measurement Issues for Adequacy Comparisons among Pension Systems

by Antonio Abatemarco
January, 2009

In this paper indexes are proposed in order to capture the degree to which a pension scheme (i) prevents from poverty among the elderly, (ii) enables living-standard smoothing after retirement, (iii) induces both intra- and inter-generational solidarity.

Retirement Behaviour in Poland and the Potential Impact of Pension System Changes

by Agnieszka Chlon-Dominczak
January, 2009

This paper focuses on retirement behaviour in Poland, especially early withdrawal from the labour market. It shows that retirement ages are very low, which can be attributed to the current regulations of the old-age pension system, as well as other pre-retirement transfers. The age of retirement is closely related to the legal framework of the … Continued

A Semi-Aggregate Model for Social Expenditure Projections

by Pier Marco Ferraresi, Chiara Monticone
January, 2009

This report describes the semi-aggregate model (SAM) developed to deliver aggregate projections of social protection expenditures as well as semi-aggregate projections of income sources by age class and gender for a number of European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Latvia, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Poland, Spain and United Kingdom) over the horizon 2005 – 2050. The partial … Continued

The Elderly Poor in the EU’s New Member States

by J.C. Vrooman (ed.)
November, 2008

To what extent is the financial position of the elderly in the NMS more vulnerable than that of the old member states (or the EU-15), due to a rather unfavourable starting point and the possible impact of pension reforms? This is the main issue of the current research report. It tries to delineate the vulnerability … Continued

Flexible Pension Systems – Postponed Retirement and Distributional Fairness

by Hannu Piekkola
October, 2008

This paper studies how both pension systems and well-being at work can be improved to postpone retirement in European households. Option values for retirement are constructed from a pool of four countries: Finland, Belgium, Germany and Spain, all relying on public-sector mandated pensions. The pooled estimation strategy diminishes the caveats of using an existing institutional … Continued

Social Security and Retirement during Transition: Microeconometric Evidence from Slovenia

by Aleš Ahčan, Sašo Polanec
October, 2008

This paper analyses old-age retirement decisions of Slovenian men and women eligible to retire in the period 1997-2003. In addition to established market economies, relatively high hazard rates of retirement are found, which decline with age. This peculiar pattern can be partly attributed to weak incentives to work inherent in the design of social security … Continued

Social Exclusion of the Elderly: A Comparative Study of EU Member States

by Gerda Jehoel-Gijsbers, Cok Vrooman
September, 2008

Combating social exclusion is one of the key objectives of pension systems. This report focuses on social exclusion among the elderly (defined as the 55+ age group) in the EU’s member states. Social exclusion has been conceptualised as a state of individuals in relation to four dimensions. Two of these dimensions – material deprivation and … Continued

Gender Difference in Retirement Income and Pension Policy – Simulating the Effects of Various DB and DC Schemes

by Michele BELLONI, Elsa Fornero
August, 2008

This analysis evaluates the relative pension positions of men and women, under different characterisations of their respective working lives and pension designs. Both Defined Benefit (DB) and Defined Contribution (DC) schemes are considered, as well as a few variants of their basic pension formula, each exemplifying a stylised normative framework. Not surprisingly, the working career … Continued

Equality of Retirement Benefits Received by Men and Women in Selected European Countries: Childbearing and Future Benefits

by Irena E. Kotowska, Joanna Stachura, Pawel Strzelecki
June, 2008

This research report seeks to answer the question of whether old-age benefit rules for women could be altered with the aim not only of ensuring better benefits for older women but also of stimulating fertility. To address this question, a micro-simulation model has been developed. The input data for the model has been drawn from … Continued

Tax/Benefit Policies and Growth Potential of the EU

by Kari E.O. Alho
May, 2008

The EU has ambitious goals for economic performance. The goals are to be reached in combination with social cohesion and environmentally sustainable development. The main economic policy instruments to be used by the EU member states are taxes and benefits. The economic and political framework for implementing measures in these areas is currently delineated, and … Continued

A Comparative Typology of Pension Regimes

by Arjan Soede, Cok Vrooman
April, 2008

This report presents an empirical typology of pension regimes in the European Union, the US, Canada, Australia and Norway. The categorisation is based on 34 quantitative and qualitative characteristics of the mandatory parts of the pension systems in these countries. The empirical analysis shows that Esping-Andersen’s classical distinction between liberal, corporatist and social-democratic welfare regime … Continued

Women’s Pension Rights and Survivors’ Benefits: A Comparative Analysis of EU Member States and Candidate Countries

by Chiara Monticone, Anna Ruzik, Justyna Skiba
April, 2008

This report presents and compares old-age income provision rules with respect to the issue of equality between women and men in the current and future EU member states. The report focuses on 25 member states and, to the extent possible, on the recently acceded and candidate countries (Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey and Croatia). The report considers … Continued

Retirement Decisions, Benefits and the Neutrality of Pension Systems

by Marek Góra
April, 2008

This study discusses the pension system as an institutional structure for intergenerational exchange. The concept of intergenerational equilibrium is introduced as a condition for pension system stability, reducing labour market distortions as well as reaching social policy goals such as giving equal value to the welfare of each generation. The changing population structure has led … Continued

The Option Value Model in the Retirement Literature: The Trade-off Between Computational Complexity and Predictive Validity

by Michele BELLONI
April, 2008

This study gives an overview of retirement modelling, starting from the single-period consumption/leisure model up to the recent life-cycle multiple-decisions and joint retirement models, paying particular attention to the role played by the option value model in the economic literature on retirement.

Differences in the Productivity Levels of Older Workers in the EU – A Cross-Country Analysis of the Age-Wage Relationship

by Mateusz Walewski
April, 2008

As the process of population ageing in Europe carries on and the retirement age rises, the relationship between age and productivity becomes increasingly important. There is concern that as the average age of the working individual goes up, the average rate of productivity growth will go down, resulting in the decreasing competitiveness of European economies. … Continued

Health Expenditure Scenarios in the New Member States: Country Report on Slovakia

by Vladimír Kvetan, Viliam Páleník, Martin Mlýnek, Marek Radvanský
December, 2007

As in other transforming economies, the Slovak economy was not able to avoid transformation recession. In its health care system, two negative effects have combined: – impact of transformation recession on financial perspective of the health system and – public sectors (with health system as a typical example) traditionally did not participate in the transformation … Continued

Health Expenditure Scenarios in the New Member States: Country Report on Hungary

by András Gábos, Róbert Iván Gál
December, 2007

This country report aims to give an estimation of the development of public health care expenditures in Hungary during the first half of the 21st century. The model used for analysis is the ILO social budget model. Since this model is a full budget model, it includes not only the expenditure side, but the revenue … Continued

Health Expenditure Scenarios in the New Member States: Country Report on Poland

by Stanisława Golinowska, Ewa Kocot, Agnieszka Sowa
December, 2007

The objective of this report is to present the model of future health care system revenues and expenditures in Poland, and to discuss assumptions for the projection and projection results. Expenditure analysis is based on ILO social budget model, part of which is health budget model. The model takes into account the revenue side of … Continued

Health Expenditure Scenarios in the New Member States: Country Report on Estonia

by Liis Rooväli
December, 2007

The aim of the study is to analyse the impact of ageing on health care expenditures developing different health expenditures and revenues scenarios for Estonia. Projections were performed using the ILO social budget model. The report gives a brief overview of the description of the model; data and underlying assumptions used for prognoses, and projected … Continued

Health Expenditure Scenarios in the New Member States: Country Report on Bulgaria

by Rossitsa Rangelova, Grigor Sariiski
December, 2007

The expenditures on health care in the new member countries from Central and Eastern Europe have never been based on the model of interdependence of socio-economic factors of the health state and the changes in the structure of population. The development of long-term scenarios here is based on the analysis of a previous study carried … Continued

Health Expenditure Scenarios in the New Member States – Comparative Report on Bulgaria, Estonia, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia

by Stanisława Golinowska, Ewa Kocot, Agnieszka Sowa
December, 2007

The objective of this comparative report is to present the model of future health care system revenues and expenditures in selected Central and Eastern European countries which are now the new EU member states, and to discuss projection assumptions and results. Health expenditure analysis and projections are based on the ILO social budget model, a … Continued

Development of Scenarios for Health and Long-Term Care Expenditure in the European Union Member States

by Ehsan Khoman, Martin Weale
December, 2007

Over the next fifty years, the size and age structure of Europe’s population will experience major changes due to low fertility rates, continuous increases in life expectancy due to medical advances and the retirement of the baby boom generation. The main output of this work package is a model which allows the construction of scenarios … Continued

The Social Dimension in Selected Candidate Countries in the Balkans: Country Report on Turkey

by Fikret Adaman, Ali Carkoglu, Refik Erzan, Alpay Filiztekin, Begum Ozkaynak, Serdar Sayan, Sinan Ulgen
December, 2007

The European Commission awarded a contract in November 2005 to a consortium composed of the TARKI Social Research Institute (Hungary), CASE, Center for Social and Economic Research (Poland) and CEPS to analyse the socio-economic developments and the process of structural reforms in what were then four candidate countries: Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Turkey. The objective … Continued

The Social Dimension in Selected Candidate Countries in the Balkans: Country Report on Romania

by Constantin Zaman, Manuela Sofia Stănculescu
December, 2007

The European Commission awarded a contract in November 2005 to a consortium composed of the TARKI Social Research Institute (Hungary), CASE, Center for Social and Economic Research (Poland) and CEPS to analyse the socio-economic developments and the process of structural reforms in what were then four candidate countries: Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Turkey. The objective … Continued

The Social Dimension in Selected Candidate Countries in the Balkans: Country Report on Croatia

by Predrag Bejaković, Zoran Šućur, Siniša Zrinščak
December, 2007

The European Commission awarded a contract in November 2005 to a consortium composed of t TARKI (Social Research Institute in Hungary), CASE (Center for Social and Economic Research in Poland) and CEPS to analyse the socio-economic developments and the process of structural reforms in what were then four candidate countries: Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Turkey. … Continued

The Social Dimension in Selected Candidate Countries in the Balkans: Country Report on Bulgaria

by Svetla Tsolova; Teodora Noncheva; Lyuben Tomev; Dimitar Chobanov; Krassen Stanchev
December, 2007

The European Commission awarded a contract in November 2005 to a consortium composed of the TARKI Social Research Institute (Hungary), CASE, Center for Social and Economic Research (Poland) and CEPS to analyse the socio-economic developments and the process of structural reforms in what were then four candidate countries: Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Turkey. The objective … Continued

The Social Dimension in Selected Candidate Countries in the Balkans – Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Turkey: Synthesis Report

by Robert I. Gal, Aniko Bernat, Funda Celikel, Marton Medgyesi, Wojciech Paczynski, Artur Radziwill, Istvan Gy. Toth, Mateusz Walewski, Przemyslav Wozniak, Daniel Gros
December, 2007

The European Commission awarded a contract in November 2005 to a consortium composed of the TARKI Social Research Institute (Hungary), CASE, Center for Social and Economic Research (Poland) and CEPS to analyse the socio-economic developments and the process of structural reforms in what were then four candidate countries: Bulgaria, Croatia, Romania and Turkey. The objective … Continued

Healthy Life Expectancy in the EU Member States

by Ehsan Khoman, Martin Weale
July, 2007

A shift in emphasis from increasing survival to improving both the length and quality of peoples’ lives has led to a greater policy interest in the United Kingdom and in Europe as a whole in summary measures of population health. Since health expectancy is a complex, multi-faceted concept, there are consequently as many types of … Continued

Public Opinion on Pension Systems in Europe

by Béla Janky, Robert I. Gal
July, 2007

Various polls reveal that Europeans, even if aware of the looming pension crisis, generally resist pension reforms. In this research report, we show that resistance may be general but it is not uniform. People may oppose reforms but they reject different components of the reform proposals depending on their labour market position, income and age. … Continued

Health Status Transitions

by Maria M. Hofmarcher, Monika Riedel, Alexander Schnabl, Gerald Sirlinger
May, 2007

This paper was prepared as Work Package IV of the AHEAD project – Ageing, Health Status and the Determinants of Health Expenditure – which has received financing from the European Commission under the 6th Research Framework Programme. The purpose of this work package was to build up a picture of the movements in health status … Continued

Incidence of Poor Health and Long-Term Care: Health Transitions in Europe – Results from the European Community Household Panel

by Andrew Bebbington, Judith Shapiro
December, 2006

This is the final report of Work Package 3 of the AHEAD project, undertaken by the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the University of Kent. This Work Package has aimed at providing estimations, based on the European Community Household Panel (ECHP), of annual probabilities of transition between health states, including two states regarded … Continued

Demographic Changes and Aggregate Health-Care Expenditure in Europe

by Terkel Christiansen, Mickael Bech, Jørgen Lauridsen, Pascal Nielsen
December, 2006

The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between ageing and the development in the aggregate health care expenditure in EU countries on a macroeconomic level when economic and institutional variables are included. The results of the model will be used to extrapolate the total health care expenditure for the next 10 … Continued

Health Status and Health Care Systems in Central and Eastern European Countries: Bulgaria, Estonia, Poland, Slovakia and Hungary

by Stanisława Golinowska, Agnieszka Sowa, Roman Topór-Mądry
December, 2006

The analysis aims to describe processes of demographic and epidemiological change, as well as health status self-assessment in selected Central and Eastern Europe countries (CEECs), including both the new member states and the candidate countries. The analysis is presented in the context of the use of medical services and the structure of services used. Special … Continued

Health and Morbidity in the Accession Countries Country Report – Slovak Republic

by Vladimír Kvetan, Viliam Páleník
December, 2006

Over the last 15 years, dramatic changes have been underway in the Slovak Republic in terms of both the health of the population and healthcare provision. This study provides information and key findings on the morbidity, health status and utilisation of healthcare services in the Slovak Republic. In presenting the demographic picture in the country, … Continued

Health and Morbidity in the Accession Countries Country Report – Poland

by Stanisława Golinowska, Agnieszka Sowa
December, 2006

The objective of this report is to analyse the prevalence of good and poor health in Poland and the impact of self-assessed health on the use of health care services. Special attention is given to the impact of ageing on health status and the utilisation of health care. In addition, other social and economic factors … Continued

Health and Morbidity in the Accession Countries Country Report – Hungary

by Edit Remák, Robert I. Gal, Renáta Németh
December, 2006

Expenditure on medical treatment has tended to rise as a proportion of national income throughout the European Union. A particular concern is that with an ageing population and therefore the prospect of more elderly persons, the pressures on expenditure for health care will increase further. The Ageing, Health Status and Determinants of Health Expenditure (AHEAD) … Continued

Health and Morbidity in the Accession Countries, Country Report – Estonia

by Liis Rooväli
December, 2006

The report gives a brief overview of the demographic situation and recent trends in Estonia during the last 10 years. A current picture of the morbidity and health status of the population is presented, wherein the most important mortality and morbidity issues are discussed along with basic data concerning the Estonian health care system, its … Continued

Health and Morbidity in the Accession Countries, Country Report – Bulgaria

by Rossitsa Rangelova
December, 2006

Not unlike other countries in Europe, Bulgaria has been subject to the steady process of population ageing, partly owing to the well-established downward trend in birth rates over the last several decades. In the past 15 years, this trend has been accompanied by the consequences of rising emigration, which has primarily involved young and active … Continued

Tax and Benefit Reforms in a Model of Labour Market Transitions

by Michal Myck, Howard Reed
October, 2006

This paper presents a method for taking advantage of labour market transitions to identify the effects of financial incentives on employment decisions. The framework used is very flexible and by imposing few theoretical assumptions it allows us to extend the modelled sample relative to structural models. The authors take advantage of this flexibility to include … Continued

Apply with Caution: Introducing UK-Style In-Work Support in Germany

by Peter Haan, Michal Myck
October, 2006

Estimates of the labour supply effects of recent UK reforms in the area of direct taxes and benefits show that policy can have a significant influence on the level of employment. We confirm this in a simulation of an in-work support system introduced into the German tax and benefit system. Our simulation results suggest that … Continued

Globalisation and Social Risk Management in Europe – A Literature Review

by Juraj Draxler
September, 2006

Globalisation has become a catch-all term imbuing public discussions with a sense of urgency about something that often cannot even be properly identified. This literature review presents an outline of arguments about what globalisation actually can mean, how to measure it and how to face it. Large parts of the world have seen an explosion … Continued

The Child Penalty – A Compensating Wage Differential?

by Christina Felfe
August, 2006

Many studies document that women with children tend to earn lower wages than women without children (a shortfall known as the ‘child penalty’ or ‘family gap’). Despite the existence of several hypotheses about the causes of the child penalty, much about the gap in wages remains unexplained. This study explores the premise that mothers might … Continued

Objective Trends and Perceptions of Health Status in Germany

by Christina Felfe
August, 2006

This paper identifies previous trends and future prospects surrounding the health status of the population and the utilisation of health care services, based on data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1984-2004). Health status and the demand for health care services is examined in conjunction with the following variables: health satisfaction; the degree to which health … Continued

Demographic Uncertainty and Fiscal Policy

by Alex Armstrong, Nick Draper, Andre Nibbelink, Ed Westerhout
August, 2006

It is well known by now that population ageing threatens the sustainability of fiscal policies in many countries. Although a number of policy options are available to address the problem, the uncertainty surrounding the future development of the population complicates matters. This paper analyses the economic, intergenerational and welfare effects of several alternative taxation policies … Continued

New Member States and the Dependent Elderly

by Corinne Mette
July, 2006

The 10 new member states that joined the European Union in May 2004 have increased the population of the EU-15 by 20% and together account for almost 16.4% of the total EU-25 population. The current ageing of the population in the EU-15 has highlighted other challenges besides the well-known problems of financing pension and health … Continued

Demographic Factors and Health Expenditure Profiles by Age: The Case of Italy

by S. Gabriele, C. Cislaghi, F.Costantini, F. Innocenti, V. Lepore, F. Tediosi, M. Valerio, C. Zocchetti
May, 2006

This paper analyses the health expenditure profile by age and gender of survivors and deceased in four Italian regions. Per capita spending on the deceased constantly diminishes after middle age. The ratio between per capita expenditures on deceased and survivors by age shows a downward trend after about 40 years. Although we chose four regions … Continued

The Impact of Death-Related Costs on Health Care Expenditure: A Survey

by Michele Raitano
February, 2006

In the economic policy debate it is often stated that population ageing will lead to huge increases in the age-related components of public expenditure – primarily pensions and health care. This paper analyses a factor that may, at least partly, alleviate the fear that increased life expectancy will accelerate the rise in health-care spending: namely … Continued

The Influence of Supply and Demand Factors on Aggregate Health Care Expenditure with a Specific Focus on Age Composition

by Erika Schultz
November, 2005

Expenditure on medical treatment has tended to increase as a proportion of national income throughout the European Union. Overall there has been a rising trend in the mean as low-spending countries such as the UK have faced political pressure to spend at least the average EU proportion of their national income on the provision of … Continued

Health and Morbidity by Age and Socio-Economic Characteristics

by Richard Layte, Anne Nolan, Brian Nolan, Tom Van Ourti
November, 2005

Expenditure on medical treatment has tended to rise as a proportion of national income throughout the European Union. A particular concern is that, with an ageing population, the pressures on health expenditure will increase further. The aim of this particular work package is to describe and model health and morbidity, and the associated use of … Continued

Option Values for Retirement: Effects of Public Incentives to Postpone Retirement in Finland, Belgium and Germany

by Hannu Piekkola, Matthias Deschryvere
August, 2005

This paper studies the determinants of the retirement transitions of Europeans and focuses on the impact of social security systems on retirement behaviour. The analysis uses the first eight waves (1994-2001) of the European Community Household Panel. Based on these survey data, option values – which express, for each retirement age, the trade-off between retiring … Continued

Informal Elderly Care and Women’s Labour Force Participation across Europe

by Tarja K. Viitanen
July, 2005

This paper uses the European Community Household Panel (ECHP) to analyse the relationship between the dynamics of labour force participation and informal care to the elderly for a sample of women aged 20-59 across 13 European countries. The analysis has two focal points: the relative contributions of state dependence as well as observed and unobserved … Continued

Wellbeing and Dependency among the European Elderly: The Role of Social Integration

by Corinne Mette
July, 2005

This study aims at highlighting the importance of social integration for the wellbeing of dependent elderly persons living at home. This question is important because, as we can observe, social activities are not a priority for social policies regarding the dependent elderly in Europe. Here it is shown that social activities and contacts improve the … Continued

Ageing, Health and Retirement in Europe The AGIR Project – Final Report on Scientific Achievements

by Jørgen Mortensen
July, 2005

A question increasingly raised in recent years is whether the trend towards longer life expectancy has been accompanied by comparable increases in the expectancy of life in good health (active or disability-free life expectancy). Formulating an answer to this question is of essential importance for projecting health expenditure and for forecasting retirement patterns over the … Continued

Scenarios for Global Ageing: An Investigation with the INGENUE 2 World Model

by Michel Aglietta, Vladimir Borgy, Jean Chateau, Michel Juillard, Jacques Le Cacheux, Gilles Le Garrec, Vincent Touzé
July, 2005

This paper explores the consequences of pension reforms in Western Europe in a world economy setting. Whereas various economic and social consequences of population ageing have been investigated in OECD countries, very few analyses have explicitly taken the worldwide aspect of the problem into account. In order to do so, this report relies on the … Continued

Can we Afford to Live Longer in Better Health?

by Ed Westerhout, Frank Pellikaan
July, 2005

This research report analyses the effects of ageing populations upon public finances. More specifically, it focuses on the implications of population ageing for acute health care, long-term care and public pension expenditures for 15 EU countries. It pays particular attention to three novel insights: i) a large proportion of health-care spending relates to time to … Continued

Alternative Scenarios for Health, Life Expectancy and Social Expenditure: The Influence of Living Longer in Better Health on Health Care and Pension Expenditures and Government Finances in the EU

by Frank Pellikaan, Ed Westerhout
June, 2005

This report investigates the effect of population ageing on public health- and long-term care expenditures, public pensions and government finances in EU countries in the projection period 2002-50. The authors specifically consider new insights about the development of demography and health on these projections. In this regard, the view has been expressed that people may … Continued

Labour Force Behaviour of Men and Women in Elderly Two-Adult Households: Evidence from EU Countries

by Matthias Deschryvere
April, 2005

This paper studies the effect of individual and spousal characteristics on the labour force participation of individuals living in elderly two-adult households. The comparative approach taken here studies men and women separately and uses the first eight waves (1994-2001) of the European Community Household Panel (ECHP). We compare results of three countries: Finland (a country … Continued

Health and Retirement Decisions: An Update of the Literature

by Matthias Deschryvere
March, 2005

This paper surveys the relation between the labour supply and the health of the elderly, based on major studies conducted earlier and new literature. Most of the empirical literature on the topic is drawn from American data, although new European datasets have enabled analysis in several EU countries. The paper complements previous surveys in that … Continued

Pension Arrangements and Retirement Choices in Europe: A Comparison of the British, Danish and German Systems

by James Sefton, Justin van de Ven, Martin Weale
February, 2005

This paper develops a general equilibrium simulation model of a heterogeneous population in which both consumption/saving and labour/leisure choices are endogenous. The authors use it to explore the effects of the different state benefit systems on the labour supply of old and older workers in Denmark, Germany and the UK. In broad terms, they find … Continued

Ageing, Health and Retirement in Europe: Alternative Scenarios for Health, Life Expectancy and Social Expenditure

by Erika Schulz
February, 2005

This study deals with the impact of ageing populations and changes in their health status on health care and the utilisation of long-term care services. Two kinds of projection methods have been used to estimate increases up to 2050 in the number of hospital cases and days, contacts with doctors, long-term care recipients and severely … Continued

Ageing Health and Retirement in Europe: Time Use, Health and Retirement

by Hannu Piekkola, Liisa Leijola
September, 2004

This study examines time use and the incentives to retire that include both the value of paid and domestic work. This is accomplished by documenting the time used in unpaid household work in a group of EU countries. An economic value is assigned to this time, which is then used to calculate the income replacement … Continued

Ageing, Health Care and Retirement in Europe: Use of Health and Nursing Care by the Elderly

by Erika Schulz
July, 2004

If the hypothesis that people live longer and in better health is true, it could be expected that the changes in the health of the elderly have important consequences for the further demand for health services, the need for long-term care and also for the development of health expenditures. But other trends could also be … Continued

Bio-Demographic Aspects of Population Ageing

by Namkee Ahn, Ricard Genova, José A. Herce, Joaquin Pereira
December, 2003

Ageing affects individuals and nations everywhere. But a precise definition of what ageing is cannot be provided easily with regard to health aspects, social conventions and lifestyles that are intertwined with the ageing process. As a first step, the ENEPRI AGIR project has attempted to describe this process in EU countries by observing as many … Continued

The Emerging Framework for Disclosure Regulation in the EU

by Arman Khachaturyan, Karel Lannoo
October, 2003

The EU is well advanced in (re-)shaping the regulatory structure for securities markets. As part of this exercise, the EU is rapidly finalising a more harmonised framework for disclosure in the prospectus, market abuse and transparency directives, and has created the structure for harmonised financial reporting principles with the International Accounting Standards regulation. Disclosure is … Continued